OSHA Trade News Release: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

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October 20, 2015
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries sign alliance to address
machinery, chemical, other hazards in scrap recycling industry

WASHINGTON - A new alliance between the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc. was recently established to protect the safety and health of workers in the scrap recycling industry, as well as promote understanding of worker rights and employer responsibilities under the OSH Act.

The alliance will focus on workplace hazards associated with powered industrial trucks and other machinery, chemical exposures, hazardous energy sources, and the handling and storage of materials.
“These hazards can result in serious injuries and death for workers in the scrap recycling industry,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “We are pleased to partner with ISRI in developing effective tools to control or eliminate safety and health hazards in this industry.”

During this two-year alliance, OSHA and ISRI will collaborate in creating and revising informational and training resources, encouraging the use of safety and health management systems and other safety performance programs, and promoting OSHA’s compliance assistance resources.
“ISRI’s alliance with OSHA underscores the recycling industry’s commitment to worker safety,” said Doug Kramer, chair of ISRI. “Now with the support of OSHA behind us, ISRI will be able to provide even greater resources for our members to ensure their workers return home to their families every night.”

ISRI is a trade association representing more than 1,600 member companies that include manufacturers, processors, brokers and industrial consumers of scrap commodities such as paper, rubber, plastics, glass and ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Members range from small businesses to multi-national corporations.

Through its Alliance Program, OSHA works with unions, consulates, trade and professional organizations, faith- and community-based organizations, businesses and educational institutions to prevent workplace fatalities, injuries and illnesses. The purpose of each alliance is to develop compliance assistance tools and resources, and to educate workers and employers about their rights and responsibilities. Alliance Program participants do not receive exemptions from OSHA inspections or any other enforcement benefits.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.

Protecting Workers During Severe Flood Events

Floods can be serious catastrophes and they are one of the most common hazards in the United States. Floods can be caused by a variety of factors, including a sudden accumulation of rain, rising rivers, tidal surges, ice jams and dam failures.

OSHA and NOAA are working together on a public education effort aimed at improving the way people prepare for and respond to severe weather. This page is designed to help businesses and their workers prepare for floods, and to provide information about hazards that workers may face during and after a flood event.

Workers who have to respond to flooded areas face the greatest risks from floods, but all workers can help protect themselves by preparing evacuation plans and learning about the hazards commonly associated with floods.

The Preparedness page provides information on making an evacuation plan, emergency supply kits, and flood watches and warnings. This planning information can help you ensure that you are ready to evacuate in an orderly manner before rising waters impact your business or residence, or your evacuation routes.

The Response/Recovery page provides useful details on the hazards to avoid when flooding has occurred. This includes areas to avoid when using a vehicle, and safety and health hazards such as downed electrical lines, mold and wild animals.
Employer Responsibilities and Workers' Rights
Each employer is responsible for the safety and health of its workers and for providing a safe and healthful workplace for its workers. Employers are required to protect workers from the anticipated hazards associated with the flood response and recovery operations that workers are likely to conduct.
OSHA's role is to assure the safety and health of America's workers. The OSHA at a Glance (PDF*) publication provides information on the strategies and programs OSHA uses to promote worker safety and health. For additional information on Workers' Rights, Employer Responsibilities, and other services OSHA offers, visit OSHA's Employers Page, Workers Page and Publications.

OSHA Trade News


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September 21, 2015
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

OSHA extends comment period for proposed rule clarifying employers' continuing
obligation to make and maintain accurate records of injuries, illnesses

WASHINGTON - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is extending the deadline for submitting comments on the proposed rule that clarifies an employer's continuing obligation to make and maintain an accurate record of each recordable injury and illness. The comment due date has been extended to Oct. 28, 2015.

OSHA issued this proposed rule in light of the decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in AKM LLC v. Secretary of Labor (Volks)* to clarify its long-standing position that the duty to record an injury or illness continues for as long as the employer must keep records of the recordable injury or illness. The proposed amendments add no new compliance obligations; the proposal would not require employers to make records of any injuries or illnesses for which records are not already required.

The proposed rule was published in the July 29, 2015, issue of the Federal Register. Members of the public can submit written comments on the proposed rule at http://www.regulations.gov, the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal. See the Federal Register notice for submission details.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

US Labor Department awards grants to 80 nonprofit organizations

US Labor Department awards $10.5M in workplace safety and health training grants to 80 nonprofit organizations

Susan Harwood Training Grant Program
OSHA has awarded $10.5 million in one-year federal safety and health training grants to 80 nonprofit organizations across the nation for education and training programs to help high-risk workers and their employers recognize serious workplace hazards, implement injury prevention measures and understand their rights and responsibilities.

OSHA's Susan Harwood Training Grant Program funds grants to nonprofit organizations, including community/faith-based groups, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, colleges and universities. Target trainees include small-business employers and underserved vulnerable workers in high-hazard industries.

In its 2015 award, OSHA is awarding approximately $2.2 million in new, targeted topic training and training and educational materials development grants to 19 organizations to develop materials and programs addressing workplace hazards and prevention strategies. Both grant types require that recipients address occupational safety and health hazards designated by OSHA, including preventing construction hazards and hazardous chemical exposures. In addition, 15 organizations will receive approximately $2.3 million in new capacity-building developmental grants to provide occupational safety and health training, education, and related assistance to workers and employers in the targeted populations. Organizations selected to receive these grants are expected to create organizational capacity to provide safety and health training on an ongoing basis.

OSHA also awarded approximately $3 million in follow-on grants to 20 capacity building developmental grantees and $3 million in follow-on grants to 26 targeted topic grantees that performed satisfactorily during fiscal year 2014. These grantees demonstrated their ability to provide occupational safety and health training, education, and related assistance to workers and employers in high-hazard industries, small-business employers, and vulnerable workers. For more information, see the news release below.

News Release

US Labor Department awards $10.5M in workplace safety and health training grants to 80 nonprofit organizations to help high-risk workers, employers

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration has awarded $10.5 million in one-year federal safety and health training grants to 80 nonprofit organizations across the nation for education and training programs to help high-risk workers and their employers recognize serious workplace hazards, implement injury prevention measures and understand their rights and responsibilities.
For more on the 2015 Susan Harwood training grants, visit www.osha.gov/dte/sharwood/ or contact Kimberly Mason at mason.kimberly@dol.gov or 847-759-7700.
The department's Susan Harwood Training Grant Program funds grants to nonprofit organizations, including community/faith-based groups, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, colleges and universities. Target trainees include small-business employers and underserved vulnerable workers in high-hazard industries.

The fiscal year 2015 award categories are capacity-building developmental, capacity-building pilot, targeted topic training, and training and educational materials development.

"Susan Harwood training grants save lives," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. "The hands-on training supported by these grants helps assure that workers and employers have the tools and skills they need to identify hazards and prevent injuries."

In its 2015 award, OSHA is awarding approximately $2.2 million in new, targeted topic training and training and educational materials development grants to 19 organizations to develop materials and programs addressing workplace hazards and prevention strategies. Both grant types require that recipients address occupational safety and health hazards designated by OSHA, including preventing construction hazards and hazardous chemical exposures.

In addition, fifteen organizations will receive approximately $2.3 million in new capacity-building developmental grants to provide occupational safety and health training, education, and related assistance to workers and employers in the targeted populations. Organizations selected to receive these grants are expected to create organizational capacity to provide safety and health training on an ongoing basis. Two of the 15 organizations received capacity-building pilot grants designed toassist organizations in assessing their needs and formulating a capacity-building plan before launching a full-scale safety and health education program.

OSHA also awarded approximately $3 million in follow-on grants to 20 capacity building developmental grantees and $3 million in follow-on grants to 26 targeted topic grantees that performed satisfactorily during fiscal year 2014. These grantees demonstrated their ability to provide occupational safety and health training, education, and related assistance to workers and employers in high-hazard industries, small-business employers, and vulnerable workers.

"The Susan Harwood Training Grant Program is an essential component of OSHA's worker protection efforts. This program provides thousands of workers and small employers with hands-on training and education in some of the most dangerous industries," said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels.

Since 1978, approximately 2.1 million workers have been trained through this program. The training grant program honors Susan Harwood, a former director of the Office of Risk Assessment in OSHA's former Directorate of Health Standards, who passed away in 1996.

For more information about the FY 2015 Susan Harwood Training Grant Program recipients, visit
More information on the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program is available on OSHA's website at www.osha.gov/dte/sharwood/.

Public inquiries should be directed to Kimberly Mason at mason.kimberly@dol.gov or 847-759-7700.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance.

OSHA News Release: [09/02/2015]
Contact Name: Laura McGinnis or Carrie A. Thomas
Phone Number: (202) 693-4653 or x4667
Email:
McGinnis.Laura.K@dol.gov or thomas.carrie.a@dol.gov
Release Number: 15-1640-NAT